Help Needed … the physical kind!

So we battle on …. We are still seeking voluntary assistance to help complete the LCP and work on the T86 radar which are located in a secure, restricted access, storage facility on the outskirts of Telford. Team members meet up most Saturday’s but come along when you have time; you do not have to come every Saturday. If interested email contact@bmpg.co.uk. Unfortunately we do not receive funding so cannot cover travel or other expenses.

41 Sqn Badge Found

When scraping paint from the LCP door today we uncovered some homemade artwork of a 41 Sqn badge as below. So our LCP, Ser. No. 1022, was either on 41 Sqn MS4 or MS6. Are there any old 41 Sqn guys around that possible remember if 41 painted their squadron badge on all their LCP’s or just 1022. Perhaps we can actually narrow 1022 down to MS4 or MS6. 1022 was definitely at Wildenrath as one of our team worked on it there.41 Sqn Badge on LCP Door.JPG

This is what it should have originally looked like.

41 Sqn.png

Current Status With Aerospace Bristol

The shared vision between ourselves and the exhibition development team at the new Filton museum was for our LCP and T86 radar to be displayed alongside the definitive national tandard Mk2 Bloodhound missile. However, over the last three years there have been significant organisational changes at what was called the Bristol Aerospace Centre and is now known simply as Aerospace Bristol run by the Bristol Aero Collection Trust. Their emphasis is markedly on Concorde of which there are a number on display elsewhere but now with with scant regard for this unique Bloodhound project.

Aerospace Bristol is due to open in the summer of 2017 with the missile on its own in the exhibition. However, it is still our plan for the LCP and T86 radar to be transferred to Filton but they will not on display at the time of opening. They will remain fully under the control of the owners BMPG Ltd (us) with the enduring vision that this important Cold War defence missile system will be displayed as an entity with the public access it requires.

Work Day July 30

Neil and Ian Paint Scraping wm.jpg
Ian and Neal paint scraping on the LCP

With Neil, Pete M, Ian and myself (Pete H)  on site a good amount of work was carried out. Plenty of the usual paint scraping which led to some excitement when it uncovered a 41 Sqn badge that had been painted on the LCP door. Obviously it confirms that our LCP, Ser. No. 1022, was on a 41 Sqn section before going to Wildenrath with 25 Sqn. Richard Vernon applied his knowledge and some good detective work and we believe that LCP 1022 was (possibly) on 41 Sqn MS6 in the late 1960’s.

 

One task being picked up again was the refurbishing of the covers for the cable outlets on the LCP cabin. All the rubber seals need replacing for a start! We are paying attention to detail as such items as the small, circular, chrome covers for the securing catches are being replaced as several have had their covering flaps broken off over the years. We also looked at removing the glass from the window in the E.C.’s door as the seal could do with renewing. A task we’ll only carry out if there is zero risk of damage or breaking the glass. Paint removal from the cabin has also revealed a good number of dents that have been filled before a repaint – at some time in the past. A good number of these dents appeared to be in a line so speculation ensued. Was this LCP air transported at some time and the air movements people were not that careful?

 

The final task was to run up the LCP and check the simulator was still serviceable, it is. The FT81 monitor had a bit of a wobble with the vertical sync taking a while to settle down. not a problem for us as if it needs removing and possibly repairing as we have a spare in the LCP.

 

 

 

Work Day July 23

The main work of the day was yet more paint scraping on the LCP but the end wall is now finished (see below), just the front and the roof to go. The end wall took a fair bit of time due to the cable ducts and the sheer number of rivet heads.

LCP end scrpaed
LCP end after paint scraping

In a gap with the scraping I created a few lanyards for the plug and socket covers.

New Plug Cover Lanyard marked.jpg
New lanyards

Looking good if I say so myself but I did say to Neil today that I couldn’t find a replacement swivel, Neil emailed me to say he has ordered enough swivels (they stop the lanyard from twisting) which are as near as he could get to the original, see photo.

Lanyard Swivel
Lanyard swivels

Now; can anyone find boot lace ferrules as per photo that will crimp 3mm cord? The attached photo of the original lanyard is the only example I have of an original lanyard, a couple of others I have are are very badly corroded and most of the plug covers were just tied on to the split ring with no crimps.

Original Cover Lanyard

We finished the day with a short discussion on if and how we could get a replacement seal for the window in the E.C.’s door. Perhaps the same type of seal used in 1960’s car windscreens? Wafting heat guns around the window and its seal is not a good idea. Can anyone help on this one and possibly find a source?

Work Day July 16

The sim was run up after a break of two weeks and pleased to say it remains serviceable.

The LCP cabin restoration continues! Quite a gang of us today as besides Neil and myself (Pete H) there was Richard V plus Dave S and his brother-in-law John. Neil and Richard had an inspiring day scraping paint of the end wall of the LCP cabin; a definite ‘mind in neutral’ job. Dave and John spent a fair bit of time battling to remove the awning spreaders from the LCP roof. After doing battle with rusted bolts and their castellated nuts retained with rusted split pins it was decided that the complete bracket assembly for each spreader would be unbolted from the cabin roof to make life easier for all. The spreaders can then be restored at a later date while the main effort remains on the main cabin. I spent time on corrosion treatment of screw heads and priming the cable duct housings of the left hand wall of the cabin. The housings are fibreglass so a special ‘plastic’ primer is being used – only available in black!

Work day July 16

The sim was run up after a break of two weeks and pleased to say it remains serviceable.

The LCP cabin restoration continues! Quite a gang of us today as besides Neil and myself there was Richard V plus Dave S and his brother-in-law John. Neil and Richard had an inspiring day scraping paint of the end wall of the LCP cabin; a definite ‘mind in neutral’ job. Dave and John spent a fair bit of time battling to remove the awning spreaders from the LCP roof. After doing battle with rusted bolts and their castellated nuts retained with rusted split pins it was decided that the complete bracket assembly for each spreader would be unbolted from the cabin roof to make life easier for all. The spreaders can then be restored at a later date while the main effort remains on the main cabin. I spent time on corrosion treatment of screw heads and priming the cable duct housings of the left hand wall of the cabin. The housings are fibreglass so a special ‘plastic’ primer is being used – only available in black!